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History (early Shahs and Ranas)


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History (general) / ancient and mediaeval history / early Shahs and Ranas / ethnic history / modern history / South Asian history
Links to articles:
Documents and websites:

Servants of the Maharajah of Nepal, by Sanjit Bhakta Pradhananga (kp 18/04/2017)

Archiving poetic history: We do not know enough about the character of Jung Bahadur, especially his diplomatic handling, by Abhi Subedi (kp 16/04/2017)

Foreign Policy Vacillation Under Rana Regime, by Yuba Nath Lamsal (rn 11/04/2017)

Jung Bahadur's Foreign Policy, by Yuba Nath Lamsal (rn 07/03/2017)

Prithvi Narayan Shah And Moral Relativism, by Narad Bharadwaj (rn 13/01/2017) [irrational and one-sided views by someone from the 'Khas-Arya national minorities'!]

Glorious (and not-so-glorious) history: Nepali history-writing has erased the contribution of Kumaonis and Garhwalis in building the brave Gurkha myth, by Deepak Thapa (kp 12/01/2017)

The Anglo-Nepal War: Impact On Foreign Policy, by Yuba Nath Lamsal (rn 13/12/2016)

The Beginning of the End of Jung Bahadur: Sri 3 Jung Bahadur Rana, supreme ruler of Nepal, is at the zenith  of his career. But he feels like an inconsequential gnat, by Dipesh Risal (kp 20/11/2016)

Unification Era Diplomacy, by Yuba Nath Lamsal (rn 04/10/2016)

Centuries-old portraitures at Siddhartha Art Gallery, by Alisha Sijapati (kp 20/05/2016)

Call for research on ‘reformer’ Yogmaya (ht 16/05/2016)

Jang’s nostalgia: King Mahendra had said he did not believe communism would come to Nepal by riding a car, by Abhi Subedi (kp 01/05/2016)

The English patients: When Jang Bahadur started Durbar High School in 1854 the curriculum was highly influenced by the British model, by Jenisha Upreti (rep 15/03/2016)

Less of a hero: Prithvi Narayan Shah and his successors were only interested in expanding their empire, by Bal Gopal Shrestha (kp 28/02/2016)

Drawing lines: Unless Nepal’s international boundaries are well defined it will be exploited by its neigbours, by Ranadhoj Limbu (kp 17/01/2016)

Pervasive Celebration Of Anniversary Of Prithvi Shah, by Siddhi B Ranjitkar (km 13/01/2016), Prithvi’s legacy: Even with the infamy attached to historical figures civilized societies preserve their past, by Dila Datt Pant (rep 14/01/2016)

PN Shah’s Birth Anniversary: Emulate Dibya-updesh, by Ritu Raj Subedi (rn 10/01/2016)

License to thrill: Without the 1923 treaty of peace and friendship with the British it would have been hard to establish Nepal's sovereignty abroad, by Biswas Baral (rep 31/12/2015)

Gurkhas at Gallipoli, by David Seddon (nt 10/07/2015)

Gurks vs Turks: This is the first installment of a series of flashbacks of the involvement of Gurkhas in the First World War, by David Seddon (nt 24/04/2015)

Status of Madhes Before Unification: Debunking Some Heresies, by Ritu Raj Subedi (rn 11/01/2015)

Prithvi Narayan Shah: Monster Of Injustice, by Siddhi B. Ranjitkar (km 11/01/2015), Forgetting the unforgettable: Prithvi Narayan’s contributions, by Bijay Aryal (ht 13/01/2015)

Postcard from the House of Gorkha, by Nirjana Sharma (rep 09/01/2015)

Paltan Ghar and the history of Nepal: There was clearly a foreign influence in the design and detailing of the building (ht 03/01/2015)

Antique silver coins dug out, by Kamal Panthi (kp 28/12/2014)

Remembering the revolution: Bairgania Conference and attacks on Birgunj and Biratnagar were turning points in the revolution against Rana autocracy, by Ram Chandra Pokhrel (kp 21/12/2014)

On British Resident Brian H. Hodgson, by Bipin Adhikari (sp 25/07/2014)

Missing the Gorkha Connection, by Prem Khatry (rn 20/05/2014)

Portrait of Dalhousie: As he directed British policy towards Nepal during a period that marked  the advent of Rana rule, an analysis of the Earl of Dalhousie is relevant, by Bhaskar Koirala (kp 11/04/2014

State still funds Jung Bahadur's shradda, by Pratibha Rawal (rep 14/03/2014)

On The Sleepy Town Of Sagauli, by Ludwig F. Stiller (sp 14/02/2014) [Excerpt from his book'The silent cry']

In the trenches of war: Nepal’s independence came with the blood of thousands of our countrymen spilt in far away places, by Deepak Thapa (kp 13/02/2014)

Bicentennial of a black day: The British government has a responsibility to the Madhes and Madhesis, by C.K. Raut (kp 07/02/2014)

6 years after demolition, Prithivi Narayan Shah's statute reinstated in Gorkha, by Narahari Sapkota (rep 03/02/2014)

Four martyrs remembered, by Chetan Adhikari (kp 30/01/2014), The fab four: Youth were angered when Rana regime started distributing earthquake relief in the form of loans, by Tejeswar Babu Gong (rep 01/02/2014)

Lineage of aristocracy struggling to make ends meet, by Pratibha Rawal (rep 14/01/2014)

Once upona time: Remembering the legacy of the first king of a unified Nepal on the occasion of his birth anniversary, by Yoga Nath Poudel (kp 11/01/2014)

The Pashmina War: The Anglo-Nepal War 1814-1816 was more about trade than territory, by Kunda Dixit (nt 03/01/2014)

Double centennial: The ambition and greed of powerful men write the history of nations and sow suffering for peoples (nt 03/01/2014), More warlike: The British preferred to recruit soldiers from Nepal’s mountain ethnicities rather than from the high castes, by Deepak Aryal (nt 03/01/2014), 100 years of platitudes: The involvement of Nepali soldiers in the First World War has more to it than military gallantry, by Sunir Pandey (nt 03/01/2014)

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